A Closer Look at Therapy for Premature Ejaculation

The verdict is still out on the absolute best way to treat premature ejaculation. This sexual dysfunction involves the inability to control climax before or during sexual intercourse. The peripheral problems with this usually involve a sexually frustrated partner and defensiveness or shame on the part of the male who cannot control his orgasm for his partner. Studies have shown premature ejaculation to occur in up to almost 40% of adult men. It is possible that it affects an even larger number, but since so few are willing to seek therapy for premature ejaculation, it is impossible to get complete statistic figures.

A Closer Look at Therapy for Premature Ejaculation

One of the more common methods of treatment includes anesthetic creams that are applied directly to the penis before intercourse. While this may have a desensitizing effect, unfortunately, the man is forced to wear a condom in order to not desensitize the sexual organs of his partner. This is not something that couples in a monogamous relationship are always willing to do. Therefore, many turn to therapy for premature ejaculation. Sexual counseling is an excellent way to achieve perspective on certain behaviors or expectations that can cause premature ejaculation, but not everyone will be willing to discuss their sex life with a stranger.

Thus we move on to door number three. The pharmaceutical industry has long been in the race to see who could provide the best prescription therapy for premature ejaculation. Viagra was in the lead for a number of years, but Cialis and Levitra have been making inroads on the market of sexual supplements. After a visit to the doctor to rule out any underlying medical issues, the physician may prescribe one of these medications. They have the benefit of being proven to work, and the patient receives medical supervision while under the care of a doctor. The downside involves occasional painful erections.

A new and modern therapy still in the earliest stages of testing for premature ejaculation is not yet available to the public. Clinical studies are just getting underway for a treatment that uses heat images during a CT scan. During the procedure, technicians will insert a microscopic electrode into the penis, and use the electrode to desensitize the penis nerve with radio waves. Due to the lack of information, it is unsure whether this has long-term effects on premature ejaculation, but those involved in “heat therapy” seem very hopeful about its permanent usage as therapy for certain types of sexual dysfunction.